Preparing Boys for Life.

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What teaching boys has taught me
Trisha Heavey, Third Grade Teacher

I knew I wanted to teach young students, but I never could have imagined the educational experiences that would come within the next decade.

I quickly realized that my true learning occurred in the classroom with my students. After my first five years teaching in public school in a school with an amazing staff, challenging students, and high needs I faced a decision: leave teaching or find a teaching experience that would allow me to develop my educational philosophy and support my teaching style.

Enter The Haverford School ... my first impression was, how can this be real? I saw engaging students, dedicated teachers, and an incredible campus. After my demonstration lesson I knew I would be able to achieve my goals as an educator here.

Teaching boys has given me a new energy as an educator. Due to supportive parents, administration, and colleagues I am able to have fun every single day. Nothing makes me feel more special than students coming into school happy, providing engaging learning opportunities, and traveling along this educational journey with a new team of young learners every year.

Teaching boys has given me a new energy as an educator. Due to supportive parents, administration, and colleagues I am able to have fun every single day. Nothing makes me feel more special than students coming into school happy, providing engaging learning opportunities, and traveling along this educational journey with a new team of young learners every year.

At Haverford, I have a classroom where everyone is a learner and a teacher. Each year I have a community of boys who become my family through social and emotional development.

Here are some lessons that my students have taught me:

1. Boys are curious, always thinking, and questioning the world around them. In the classroom that means hands-on, real-world connections, and providing a clear purpose.

2. Boys are energetic. As a teacher and a learner I have realized that movement, active engagement, and time to balance our fun with focus is pretty entertaining.

3. Boys want consistency and firm boundaries. They like routines, predictability, and knowing what to expect.

4. Boys will play hard, competitively, and want to be the best. As a teacher I see that as goal oriented, driven, and focused.

5. Boys are emotional. People may not think that in a boys' school, reading a story about friendship could cause my class to cry. My students are able to express their emotions without judgment, but with plenty of support. We are a community.

6. Most importantly, boys will give you 100% if you care and take time to acknowledge their efforts, interests, and personal gains.

I may have become a teacher to inspire our future, but my present students inspire me to continue to learn, problem solve, and research what is the best way to support them.

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