Preparing Boys for Life.

More than 400 students attend The Haverford School’s 11th annual Middle School Diversity Conference

Middle school students from 28 schools attended The Haverford School’s 11th annual Middle School Diversity Conference on March 14. The conference’s theme was “Kinship and Friendship: Making Connections Across Lines of Difference.” 

Dr. Rodney Glasgow, a leading diversity, equity, and social justice practitioner, was the keynote speaker at the event. His speech highlighted ways to recognize injustice and bias in daily life, and educated students on being an ally by supporting or siding with those who feel marginalized.

Glasgow shared experiences of his own as both an ally and as a marginalized individual. He then invited students to discuss their own stories with the audience.

“I encourage you to continue to share your own stories because I have found that every time I tell my story, a little part of me heals,” said Glasgow. “Your boldness is being who you are, and has a direct impact on your school community.”  

We gathered for the Diversity Conference to reimagine how to build and strengthen our communities of friends with ally-ship and intention. We wanted attendees throughout the day to ask themselves how to build a healthy relationship in ways that go beyond lines that divide us, and to use those practices daily. Brendon Jobs, Director of Diversity and Inclusion

Homa Tavangar, author of Growing Up Global, spoke to students on being a global citizen and a friend to the whole human race. She challenged students to shift their thinking from what they want to be when they grow up, to thinking about what problem they want to solve in the future. 

“We gathered for the Diversity Conference to reimagine how to build and strengthen our communities of friends with ally-ship and intention,” said Brendon Jobs, Director of Diversity and Inclusion at The Haverford School. “We wanted attendees throughout the day to ask themselves how to build a healthy relationship in ways that go beyond lines that divide us, and to use those practices daily.” 

The event, which is the largest of its kind in the region, seeks to foster understanding and inclusion among middle school students. Approximately 450 boys and girls participated in small group activities, and educators attended a professional development workshop during the conference. 

This year’s conference yielded the largest attendance in its 11-year history.